Age Less / Live More

Loneliness, living alone and poor social connections are as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. It’s worse for you than obesity. And you’re much more likely to suffer from dementia, heart disease, and depression if you’re isolated and alone(1). The importance of social connections and touch has been proven in both human and animal models, but the solution is much less obvious.

How do combat the loneliness epidemic? My guest on this week’s show has some excellent ideas.

Listen & Learn: 

  • How loneliness is one of the biggest risk factors for all-cause mortality
  • The difference between feeling alone and feeling isolated
  • How positive social connection is more important than just social connection
  • Why education and volunteering can be simple ways to find connection  
  • How our digital age is making loneliness the norm 

Links & Resources:

About Our Guest:
Dr. Kelli Harding is a board-certified psychiatrist focused on emotional wellbeing and the interplay between mental and physical health. She’s the author of THE RABBIT EFFECT: Live Longer, Happier, and Healthier with the Groundbreaking Science of Kindness.   

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Meat-Only Diet

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Direct download: 391_-_The_Rabbit_Effect_w_Dr._Kelli_Harding.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 10:00pm CEST

You could still smoke indoors when I moved to Spain in 2009. Thankfully, it was banned in 2010 as part of an on-going anti-tobacco campaign that has since failed miserably. Fifteen years ago, 32% of people smoked. Today, 34% smoke. Somehow, the US has managed to get smoking rates down to 14%, and yet, even with a nationwide campaign, consumption here goes up. Why? 

My guest on this week’s podcast has spent much of her career studying and dissecting human habit formation and change. The reasons why you do what you do are not obvious and not even conscious, so changing them requires a deeper understanding of self. 

Listen & Learn:   

  • How the US anti-smoking campaign was so successful
  • Why the “5 a Day” healthy eating campaign flopped
  • The small role that motivation plans in your habits
  • What mechanisms are at play when habits are formed 
  • The roles of friction, cues, and beliefs in habit formation 

Links & Resources: 

About Our Guest:
Wendy Wood is a psychologist and the Provost Professor of Psychology and Business at USC where she has been a faculty member since 2009. Her primary research contributions are in habits and behavior change, along with the psychology of gender. She is the author of a new book Good Habits, Bad Habits.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Meal Timing

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Direct download: 390_-_How_to_Break_Bad_Habits.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 2:56pm CEST

I’ve set a personal goal to live to be 122, and I specifically chose this number because it seems like a stretch but also totally within the realm of reasonable given my age and the advances in science. My children, I’m almost certain, will easily surpass my age simply because they have even more time for science to make it possible. So if 80 is the new 50, what does that mean for our hair, teeth, and liver? What choices should we make now to extend not just our lifespan but our healthspan too?

My guest on this week’s show is a thought leader on longevity, and he’ll share his latest research from Harvard. 

Listen & Learn

  • How metformin, resveratrol, and NAD might be the ultimate pill stack for longevity we know of
  • Why it’s important to get hungry
  • Why you need to exercise to the point of breathlessness
  • How 20% of your health is genetic, the other 80% is up for grabs
  • How your choices today play out in your healthspan in the future

Links & Resources

About Our Guest
David A. Sinclair, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biological Mechanisms of Aging. He is best known for his work on understanding why we age and how to slow its effects. He’s the author of a new book, Lifespan, found on Amazon or at his site.

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Direct download: 389_-_How_to_Live_Forever_with_David_Sinclair_PH.D.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 10:58am CEST

When you’re fasting, your body undergoes rapid healing that is very well-documented and exciting, but it’s also extremely impractical. When you spend a few days without eating, you’re weak, tired, hangry, and no good for much of anything except lying around the pool (hence the need for fasting resorts). But what if there was a way to get many of the same hormone-balancing and neuroprotective benefits of fasting while still eating and feeling good? This is where ketosis comes in, and while it’s turned into a fad diet, the real uses for the occasional reset are timeless and relatively simple to use.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why ketosis is anti-inflammatory
  • How it takes time to adapt to eating healthier fat
  • Why the real exciting health changes are in the boring middle (not the extremes)
  • How to think about food and nutrition from a balanced perspective
  • Why inflammation can often be the deeper underlying issue with many fads in health

Links & Resources:


About Our Guest
Dr. Will Cole promotes functional-medicine and specializes in clinically investigating underlying factors of chronic disease and customizing health programs for thyroid issues, autoimmune conditions, hormonal dysfunctions, digestive disorders, and brain problems.

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Direct download: 388_-_Being_Ketotarian_with_Dr._Will_Cole.mp3
Category:Nutrition -- posted at: 10:28am CEST

My worst fear with aging is losing my cognitive abilities, forgetting my kids’ names, and just becoming an old fool. It’s easy to assume that the brain will go along with the body, but there’s pretty good evidence to suggest that your mental age can be a decade younger than your physical body’s age, but you have to start working on it now.

On this week’s show, you’ll meet a neuroscientist whose mission is to help us all understand how to take better care of our brains. 

Listen & Learn

  • Why your brain needs 7-9 hours of sleep or you'll lose IQ points the next day
  • How nutrition and hydration are essential for neural health 
  • How exercise can dramatically slow brain aging 
  • Why a sense of belonging is the number one factor in neural health 

Links & Resources


About Our Guest

Dr. Tara Swart is a neuroscientist, leadership coach, author, and a medical doctor. She helps leaders achieve mental resilience and peak brain performance, improving their ability to manage stress, regulate emotions and retain information. Her newest book is called The Source.

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Direct download: 387_-_Neuroscience_and_Leadership_with_Dr_Tara_Swart.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:57am CEST

Hormonal birth control has been directly correlated with weight gain, mental health problems, and decreased libido—not exactly an ideal mix when it comes to sexuality. But what are you supposed to do? What is the alternative? With anything health and wellness, all decisions are personal, but unfortunately, most decisions are uninformed. 

Our guest on this week’s show will shed some light on the real concerns so you can make the decision that is right for you.

Listen & Learn

  • How the pill can make you attracted to less masculine men
  • How birth control can lead to anxiety and depression
  • Why non-oral hormones carry a higher risk for mental health problems
  • How old school methods are worth considering in some cases 
  • How a pill can have cascading effects throughout your mind and body 

Links & Resources

About Our Guest
Sarah E. Hill, Ph.D. is a research psychologist and professor who studies health, relationships, and social behavior. Her research lab is located in the Department of Psychology at TCU in Fort Worth, Texas. She is also a writer, speaker, and author. Her book, This is Your Brain on Birth Control, is available on Amazon or on her website.

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Direct download: 386_-_Your_Brain_on_Birth_Control_with_Sarah_E._Hill_PhD.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 10:29am CEST

I had a rough year in 2006. It was the year I opened my first yoga studio. I should have been on cloud nine, but I wasn’t ready for all that responsibility and all that stress. I had a staff of 12, hundreds of students, courses, a restaurant, and very little support. Mostly, I was alone. An old friend sent me some audio meditation tracks he’d be using that had a technology called binaural beats. I’d never heard of it, but I gave it a try. Right away, I felt something.

Technology and I have a complex relationship, but when it makes life easier, I’m a fan. Meditation is really hard, and anyone who tells you differently is actually just walking their dog (and calling it meditation). The real practices require deep work, and it’s very hard to do all alone at home, even with books and apps. This is why I love yoga breathing, and it’s also why frequency-following music can be very helpful, particularly when you’re just getting started or in a mental and emotional jam.

My guest on this week’s show is an audio engineer who makes meditation music, and he’ll share how this simple technology can potentially help you find more balance. 

Links & Resources

About Our Guest

Cory Allen is an author, podcast host, meditation teacher, and audio engineer from Austin, TX. His first book, Now Is the Way, was just released. Cory has studied and produced music for over 15 years. He has released over a dozen albums. 

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Direct download: 385_-_Binaural_Beats__Meditation_with_Cory_Allen.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:33pm CEST

I wanted to run a marathon this year. The truth is, I hardly ever run, but like any good mid-life crisis man, I wanted to tackle that goal to prove to myself I still could do hard things. Sounds great, right? Fun and challenging? Here’s the problem—I didn’t do it. I don’t even think I wanted to do it.

If I had been smarter, I would have set a tiny goal, like running 5 km per week for a year for example. Then I could “win” the goal, and if the marathon happened, it’d be gravy. Instead, here I am approaching the end of the year. I’ve actually logged at least 10 km/week all year long, but I don’t feel like it matters. But it does matter. My goal was just poorly crafted. 

In this “dream big” and “hustle hard” era, it can be difficult to dial it back and make tiny goals and tiny habits, but I’m convinced it’s where most of the change is actually possible. On this week’s show, Dr. BJ Fogg shares his behavior change research from his upcoming book. 

Listen & Learn

  • How you need an epiphany, an environment change, or a collection of tiny habits to make lasting change
  • Why stacking small successes is often much wiser than chasing huge moonshots
  • Why feeling good is the best way to change
  • How things that make you feel guilt and shame are unlikely to motivate you long-term 

Links & Resources:

Nutritional Tip: Food Allergies

About Our Guest

Dr. BJ Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University, where he directs research and innovation. He teaches industry innovators how to use his models in Behavior Design. The purpose of his research and teaching is to help people improve their lives. BJ is the author of Persuasive Technology, and Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything is coming out in a couple months.

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Direct download: 384_-_Tiny_Habits_that_Lead_to_Big_Change_with_Dr._BJ_Fogg.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 11:03am CEST

You close your blackout curtains, flip your phone to airplane mode, and crawl into bed with all the best intentions to get 7.5 hours of sleep—and then your monkey mind starts peeling bananas.

Work deadlines stream through your mind, the next episode of your current favorite series beckons, and for no good reason, you’re dying to see what your friends are posting on Instagram. Thirty minutes pass, and more of the same. You’re now worried you’ll have raccoon eyes at the office meeting in the morning, but that thought just makes things worse. You finally fall asleep at 2:00 am and manage just four hours of sleep. Sound familiar?

Many people overcome this by drinking half a bottle of red wine, puffing on a CBD vape pen, or popping an Ambien—but these are all Band-Aids. The underlying problem has not been solved. You’ve got a sleep problem, and it needs to be fixed.  


Sleep expert Dr. Guy Leschziner dedicates his work to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders, and he’s my guest on this week’s show. 

Listen & Learn

  • Why 50% of your sleep tendencies are likely inherited 
  • How to intelligently use sleep apps and other consumer tracking devices 
  • Why REM sleep is not fully understood and can even be problematic 
  • How sleep problems and mental health are very much a chicken and egg problem
  • How to know when to get professional medical help 

Links & Resources


About Our Guest
Guy is the clinical lead for the Sleep Disorders Centre at Guy's Hospital, which is one of Europe's largest sleep units. He is also Reader in Neurology at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London. His new book The Nocturnal Brain: Nightmares, Neuroscience and the Secret World of Sleep is available now.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

Apples vs Oranges

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Direct download: 383_-_Nocturnal_Brain_with_Dr_Guy_Leschziner.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 12:20pm CEST

I said goodbye to my grandfather when I was 8 years old. He had his first heart attack, and my mom was convinced he didn’t have long to live. Turns out he had many, many years ahead of him. Unfortunately, he was riddled with recurring heart problems, Parkinson’s, and a whole host of medical challenges. He lived a long life, but not a healthy one. His rapid decline shook my family, turned my mother into a health fanatic, and she passed the bug onto me. 


I wish I could say that pleasure and dreams of excellence motivate me, but it’s pain and fear that drive most of the big moves in my life. “I don’t want to end up in a rocking chair watching Wheel of Fortune,” gets me to my yoga mat much more often than “I want to glow with radiant energy.” I wish I chased carrots, but mostly, I run from the stick. What about you?

My guest on this week’s show is a medical doctor who has dedicated most of his work to trying to unravel the complex challenge that is the #1 killer in the world: heart disease. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How medical advances treating heart disease are largely responsible for extended life expectancy 
  • Why Lipitor is one of the most prescribed drugs in the world
  • How your choices and health goals might shift if you planned to live past 100 in a healthy state
  • Healthspan vs. lifespan: What matters most? 
  • What the “heart-healthy” 1980s got right and what we got wrong

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

 Physician, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich is the author of the new book, State of the Heart - Exploring the History, Science and Future of Cardiac Disease that we’ll be talking about today. He writes for the New York Times but also contributes to the Guardian, the Atlantic, the LA Times and the Boston Globe. He completed internal medicine and cardiology training at Harvard Medical School and Duke University. Haider has appeared on CNN, Fox, CBS, PBS, and shows like Fresh Air, The Diane Rehm Show, The World, Marketplace and the BBC World Service.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Garlic and feeling bad

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Direct download: 382_-_The_State_of_the_Heart_with_Haider_Warraich.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 3:46pm CEST

Would you survive if you had to grow or forage your own food for an entire year? Would you eat roadkill, wild yam, coconuts, and acorn grubs? Rob Greenfield is finishing up 365 days straight growing and gathering (from the ‘wild’) as his own food. Rob is an adventurer, environmental activist, humanitarian, and a guy on a mission to create a more sustainable and just world.

Listen & Learn: 

  • Why our current food systems are broken
  • How extremes can plant seeds for moderate ideas that make more sense
  • Why mono-crops and siloed thinking have a lot in common 
  • How our planet will look and feel with 9 billion people on it 

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Rob Greenfield is an adventurer, environmental activist, humanitarian, and a guy on a mission to create a sustainable and just world. He dumper-dived into more than two thousand dumpsters across the United States, cycled across the USA three times, wore all his own garbage as clothing for 30 days, and spent the past year growing and foraging his own food. Rob walks his talk.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Hydration

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Direct download: 381_-_A_Year_Spent_Growing__Foraging_Your_Own_Food_with_Rob_Greenfield.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:30pm CEST

“Inhale fresh, life-giving oxygen… exhale toxic, dead carbon dioxide,” said my yoga teacher. I’ve heard some variation of this hundreds of times in classes. Oxygen is good, carbon dioxide is bad. In with the good, out with the bad. Right? 

As it turns out, this kindergarten understanding of breathing physiology is wrong. Most of us could really benefit from more CO2 because it opens up your air passageways, relaxes smooth muscle tissues, and allows for greater absorption of oxygen. Lack of CO2 actually leads to a lack of oxygen. Confused yet? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. 

On this week’s show, we’ll set the record straight and help you understand why slow breathing boosts CO2, and why that’s a good thing. 

Listen & Learn:  

  • The CO2 paradox: why you need carbon dioxide to actually absorb oxygen
  • Why 4-6 liters of air per minute is what we need but most people breathe 2x that much 
  • How over-breathing reduces (not increases) oxygen levels
  • Why over-breathing and mouth breathing is associated with dozens of neurological disorders and diseases 
  • How to slow down your breath 

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST 

Dr. Artour Rahkimov has been teaching the Buteyko method and breath retraining to thousands of students for more than 17 years. He was trained by Ludmila Buteyko and Dr. Andrey Novoh-zhilov, MD, the Chief Physician of the Buteyko Clinic in Moscow. Dr. Artour trained numerous breathing practitioners in the US, Germany and Denmark.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Why bread makes me sick

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Direct download: 380_-_CO2_is_Your_Friend_with_Dr._Artour_Rahkimov.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:24am CEST

People often compare the human body to a car, but this is a bad analogy (unless it’s a Tesla) because your body doesn’t contain a combustion engine. You’re electric, my friend, and your nerves are in the driver’s seat. One electrical stimulus makes you anxious, another makes you calm; mostly, you’re an out-of-control cross-fire of signals that kicks you around energetically and emotionally throughout the day.

To know your nerves, you must know the vagus nerve. It’s the master controller of the parasympathetic branch of your autonomic nervous system - and it’s more complex than simply “rest and digest.” Let’s deep dive into the polyvagal theory on this week’s show. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How to better understand your body’s nervous system responses
  • The importance of the vagus nerve for stress modulation 
  • How to deal with triggers and embrace and appreciate glimmers
  • The polyvagal theory explained
  • Ventral vagal complex: readiness to connect
  • Dorsal vagal complex: collapse and freeze

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST 

Deb is a clinician, consultant, lecturer, and coordinator of the Traumatic Stress Research Consortium in the Kinsey Institute. Her work is based on the Polyvagal Theory to understand and resolve the impact of trauma, understand the autonomic nervous system, and move into states of protection and connection. She is the author of the book The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy available on Amazon or through her website.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Organic vs conventional

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Direct download: 379_-_Know_Your_Nerves_-_Polyvagal_Theory_with_Deb_Dana.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:14pm CEST

My second child has black circles under his eyes in all his photos from birth to age four. He slept as little as possible and willed himself through most days with all the angst and irritability of any insomniac. At age four, he finally started sleeping and quickly became a new person. He learned more, laughed more, talked (a lot) and was a joy to be around. Was it just the sleep? No, but it made a huge difference. No more nervous anxiety in the mornings, no more dark circles, and finally, he seemed to find real moments of peace. 


When kids sleep poorly, parents sleep poorly, and the entire health and happiness of the household are affected. When you sleep badly, you’re obviously tired and grumpy, but there are much more worrying long-term effects that can include malformed jaws (in children), weight gain, mood disorders, and cognitive impairment. But what can you do? 

Listen & Learn:  

  • How poor sleep decreases leptin (satiety hormone) and increases ghrelin (hunger hormone) 
  • How bad sleep is correlated with hedonistic eating (think Netflix+ Haagen-Dazs binges)
  • How attachment parenting may not be the best approach for you
  • Why “cry it out” techniques are not for everyone and not for every stage of development
  • How to discern what you can and should control and what you should simply let go of  

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Craig is a pediatrician at Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital in New Haven, CT, specializing in the care of children with breathing and sleep problems. He is boarded in Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Sleep Medicine. His book, It’s Never Too Late to Sleep Train, is available on Amazon or on his website.  

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Eat seaweed

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The American life expectancy is currently 79, which sounds great until you realize that is the 26th in line worldwide. Despite being one of the most developed and wealthy nations in the world, the US system is not only ridiculously overpriced (at least 2x), it’s also ineffective. It’s a double fail with upstream and downstream effects that are impossible to even begin to quantify. This wonky system was built post World War II with financial incentives going to everyone except the average citizen, and while no one has a clear cut solution, everyone agrees that things must change. 


My guest on the show is a medical doctor and industry insider-turned-whistle blower, and his insights provide an optimistic 10+ year outlook for change. 

Listen & Learn:  

  • How the medical industry has 4x the number of lobbyists than the military 
  • Why the US medical system is about 2x overpriced 
  • How Germany, Canada, and the Scandanavian countries all seem to do it better 
  • How spending on medical care is on track to reach 20% of GDP by 2026

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Mike Magee is on faculty at Presidents College at the University of Hartford. He has worked as a doctor, a university medical school administrator, a hospital executive, and head of global medical affairs for Pfizer. He’s the author of the book Code Blue: Inside America’s Medical-Industrial Complex available on Amazon.

Links & Resources:

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Choose Seafood

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Direct download: 377_-_Medical-Industrial_Complex_with_Mike_Magee_MD.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:45am CEST

I live in Spain where the average life expectancy just hit 83 years—number three in the world, less than one percentage of a point behind Switzerland and Japan. Foreigners often hypothesize that the reason is due to the diet, the long walks, or red wine that keep people alive until such an old age, but after I’ve lived here for 10 years, I must disagree.

As I look out of my office window right now, the corner cafe is filled with office workers on a morning break drinking coffee, smoking cigarettes, and eating croissants. In the evening, that same crew will return for beer and wine, deep-fried tapas, and another round of cigarettes. This is the norm.

So why then do they live so long? My theory is that people are less stressed, on average, all the time. Plus, the family unit and social ties are extremely strong. Grown adults will share a sitdown meal with their parents weekly (or more). Friendships are cherished and developed, the average workday is long and leisurely, and life is slower and less intense.

Research clearly shows that great relationships and reduced stress are predictive of health worldwide, and yet most of us obsess much more about the perfect meal or the perfect workout (at least I do).

Chronic stress is a silent killer that affects your mood, your waistlines, your hormones, and mental health. The goal is not to live a stress-free life, that’s impossible; instead, our aim should be to reduce the stressors we can and manage the rest effectively through diet, exercise, nutrition, breathing, and positive mental models. Our guest on this week's podcast teaches a “stress less” holistic approach to wellness.

Listen & Learn: 

  • Why 90% of periodontal disease has no pain and how a lack of pain in life is not a signal of no problems
  • How thoughts are things, literally, they are neurotransmitters made of proteins
  • The PERMA model (positive, engaged, relationships, meaning, accomplishment)

 

Links & Resources:


ABOUT OUR GUEST

B.D.S (Syd Uni) FACNEM (Dent) Dr. Ron Ehrlich is a holistic health advocate, educator, and holistic dentist. Dr. Ron has developed his health model of how stress affects our health; breaking stress down to emotional, environmental, nutritional, structural and dental stressors. He’s the author of the book A Life Less Stressed available on Amazon or his website. 

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  •  Garlic Onion

Got Questions?

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 
Direct download: 376_-_A_Life_Less_Stressed_with_Dr._Ron_Ehrlich.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 10:52am CEST

Imagine a mosquito bites your arm. You scratch the bump and it grows big and red and doesn’t go away for months. You’d be panicked, right? Now, imagine that the red inflamed area is inside your gut, your small intestines, and your colon. What now? Just because you can’t see it doesn’t mean it’s not there. The long-term health impact of gastrointestinal inflammation is devastating. At the extremes, there’s Crohn’s and Colitis, but hundreds of millions of people are suffering from endocrine disruption, nutrient malabsorption, and general malaise due do this lurking problem. 


My guest on this week’s show was so skinny you could see all his bones. He was drugged up and nearly dead from this hardcore bowel disease—but he fixed it. Naturally. No more medicine. Despite the odds, he’s 55 pounds heavier today and looks like a fitness model. His research is solid and his advice takes each individual into account.

You’ll Learn: 

  • What Crohn’s and Colitis are
  • How inflammation can be a silent killer
  • How epigenetics can be influenced by diet and lifestyle 
  • Why some people go fruitarian and others meatatarian - who’s right? 
  • How cheat days can still happen — you don’t have to be perfect

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dane Johnson is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist and Health Coach. Years ago, he was diagnosed with Crohn's Disease and Colitis that got so extreme he was on a feeding tube, chemotherapy, immunosuppressants, and nearly dead. Today, he takes zero drugs, gained 55 pounds of lean muscle, travels the world, and is super healthy. 

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Calorie deficit

Got Questions?

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 
Direct download: 375_-_Crohns__Colitis_-_Surviving__Thriving_with_Dane_Johnson.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:54pm CEST

More than 80% of people are dissatisfied with their work, and yet work is where we spend the majority of our waking hours. People say things like “Do what you love and the money will follow” and “Follow your passion…” but is it really that simple? Not for most of us. On this week’s show, author, speaker, and entrepreneur, Evan Carmichael, shares his research for finding meaning and purpose at work. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • Why most people run away from their life rather than running toward a better one 
  • Why most people choose entertainment and distraction over hard work
  • How one word, one value, probably drives 80% of your behavior
  • The “who”, “why”, and “how” of your life

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Evan is an entrepreneur, author, speaker, and Youtuber. At age 19, he built and then sold a biotech software company. At 22, he was a venture capitalist helping raise $500k to $15mil. He now runs the biggest YouTube channel for entrepreneurs with 1M+ subscribers. He’s committed to creating more entrepreneurs.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Ice water

Got Questions?

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes  
Direct download: 374_-_How_to_Find_Work_You_Love_Doing.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:41am CEST

One in five women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted in college in America*, so there are literally tens of millions of victims living every day with guilt, shame, pain, trauma, and baggage.

How can we be body-positive and sex-positive in this environment? How do people trust each other or even themselves? The challenges between men and women have existed since the beginning of time, and yet, the rules of engagement are unclear; and mostly, things are left unsaid, trauma is left to fester, and no one is getting any closer to their true, vulnerable selves.

On this week’s podcast, we attempt the impossible task of unraveling this issue. 

Listen & Learn:

  • Why the workplace is one of the most poorly defined environments for men and women to interact — and it’s where we spend most of our waking hours
  • Why there must be the possibility of reconciliation or we all become monsters and demons 
  • How in the 21st century, men and women still have no idea how to work together, give clear consent, and draw boundaries 

Links & Resources:  

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Dr. Jenn Gunsaullus, sociologist and sexologist, is a frequent speaker about sexual empowerment, healthy relationships, body image, erotic play, and sexual health. She is a TEDx speaker and a recurring intimacy expert on the San Diego Morning News. She’s also a black belt in the Koren martial art, Soo Bahk Do. She is the author of the book Madness to Mindfulness: Reinventing Sex for Women that we’ll be talking about today. 

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Vitamin timing

Got Questions?

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 

Just as an infant requires physical touch to ensure healthy development, every adult requires intimacy and connection to be mentally and physically healthy... and yet many of us are left lacking. A lingering hug can increase oxytocin and decrease cortisol, deep conversations can be neuroprotective, and a true friend or lover can alter not just your emotional life but also your biology. On this week’s show, we’ll unpack the role between intimacy and your endocrine system, and the vital importance in finding balance. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How healthy testosterone levels can reduce or even eliminate the risk of Alzheimer's
  • Why BPA-lined cans (including sparkling water) can block oxytocin receptors 
  • The role of the sex hormones in brain volume and function
  • Why the nuclear family is supported by biology 
  • Hippocampal shrinkage induced by lack of intimacy   

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Devaki Lindsey Berkson is a thought leader in functional medicine and women’s health. She has been in clinical practice for nearly four decades, and her research has focused on hormones, nutrition, and the gut. She has written 21 books. Her most recent include: The Sexy Brain, Safe Hormones Smart Women, and Hormone Deception.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • K2 MK4

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Direct download: 372_-_The_Sexy_Brain__Intimacy__Health_with_Dr._Lindsey_Berkson_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:22pm CEST

Any relationship crisis is usually coupled with a communication breakdown. Your needs are not being met, so you shut down. You’re upset about something, but instead of voicing it, you bottle it up. Your partner does the same, and over time, you grow distant, bitter, and even resentful. We’ve all experienced this poor communication pattern at some point.

But what does good communication even look like?

Do you take notes and make an outline of your key points? Do you talk, text, or email? There is no right answer to this, but everyone in a relationship needs to figure it out one way or another to survive. On this week’s show, you’ll meet a couple’s counselor who shares her best practices for couples in crisis and those who want to avoid problems in the future. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How to assign one listener and one speaker during conversations
  • The “doing” versus “feeling” part of showing love
  • How to navigate the complexities of money, sex, and lack of time 
  • Emotional versus physical affairs
  • How polarity attracts and also creates conflict

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Sonya Jensen is a marriage counselor, premarital counselor, relationship coach, and breakup recovery counselor with Growing Self Counseling and Coaching. Her practical, positive approach helps couples succeed, and individuals create positive changes in their lives.

 

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Ketones

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 

 

Direct download: 371_-_Communication_in_Relationships_with_Sonya_Jensen.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59pm CEST

You don’t manage to leave the office until 8 pm. Traffic is terrible, so it takes you an hour to get home. One of your relatives is sick and has been texting you all day, but you haven’t had a moment to call to check in. Your taxes are due in a few weeks, and you don’t have any idea how much you’ll owe. You’re best friend is just not there for you the way she used to be. She hasn’t called you in weeks.

It’s Thursday evening, and you’re all alone in your kitchen trying to manage this very common mundane overwhelm that comes with everyday life. So what do you do?

No one is looking, no one will ask… Is it a Haagen Dazs and Netflix binge? Sleeping pills and a glass of red wine? Do you vape or watch porn? We all have our escapes. When the pressure cooker of our lives builds, it has to find a release. But most of our choices are destructive. On this week’s show, we’ll talk about how to find a better way.

Listen & Learn: 

  • Why sobriety is often a sliding scale
  • How dose and frequency often determine damage and risk
  • How cocaine was not deemed addictive until 1986
  • Why the opposite of addiction is choice
  • The challenges of positive escapes in a stressful world 

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Grisel is a behavioral neuroscientist with expertise in pharmacology and genetics whose research focuses on determining root causes of drug addiction. She’s the author of a new book, Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Pink Salmon

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 

Thanks to Our Sponsor:

Molekule – has completely reinvented the air purifier. From the inside out, Molekule has reimagined what clean air ought to look and feel like—unobtrusive, portable, and 100% effective.

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Direct download: 370_-_The_Neuroscience_of_Addiction_with_Judith_Grisel.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:05pm CEST

The pursuit of health, wealth, and relationships drive 99% of our action, but just how important are each of these to you personally? How much time are you willing to invest and what are you willing to sacrifice to achieve your goals in these three areas? My guest on this week’s show has flipped the script in many ways and is doing more with less, simplifying his life, living off the grid at times, and cherry-picking his life experiences.

A truly simple life is not for everyone (mine is oozing with complexity), but we can all benefit from simplifying some major areas of our life immediately.

Listen & Learn:

  • How little money you probably need to be free
  • Responsible use of social media and the internet
  • How meaning and purpose are more important than money and possessions 

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Gary Collins worked as a Special Agent for the U.S. State Department Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He has degrees in Exercise Science, Criminal Justice, and Forensic Science. Gary lives off the grid part of the year in a remote part of Washington State, and the other part of the year exploring in his travel trailer with his dog. 

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Eat Essential Oils

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 
Direct download: 369_-_How_to_Lead_a_Simple_Life_Now_With_Gary_Collins.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:12pm CEST

How many of your exes are you connected to on Facebook? How often do you find yourself dredging up past emotional head trash from lost love? For most people, the answer is “too often.” We live in an era where forgetting and moving on has never been more challenging, and most of us need to learn strategies to put the past in its place to make room for a fulfilling future. And some of us are even “exaholics,” literally addicted to the emotional rollercoaster of times long ago. On this week’s show, therapist and marriage counselor, Dr. Bobby, will share her strategies for navigating this emotional minefield. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How we’re biologically wired for love, lust, and emotional attachment 
  • The lost art of forgetting: how to relearn it
  • How to navigate the booby trap that is social media 
  • Ghosting vs. honest conversations about boundaries 

Links & Resources:   

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby is a marriage counselor, therapist, and life coach based in Colorado. She is the author of the book Exaholic: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Canned Tomatoes

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 

Your home and workspace affect your mood, your sleep, your productivity, and your feeling of belonging, but how much time have you spent to make them truly serve you? For most of us, we’re stuck working in a random office environment, and we might not even be able to control our living space as much as we’d like. The feeling you get is subjective, of course, but there is an emerging science that teaches us fascinating universal truths about what makes a great space. On this week’s show, you’ll meet an environmental psychologist who has made this her life’s work. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • How “prospect” and “refuge” tendencies affect our preferred seat at the table (or desk!) 
  • Why 50 percent of the human population lives near water, and why we respond so positively to bodies of water
  • How to take a BALANCED (biophilia, atmosphere, layout, amenities, noise, cohesion, energy, and design) approach to home design 
  • Simple ways to look for and plan the spaces you occupy

Links & Resources:  

Visit: http://spaceworksco.com/

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Lily is an environmental psychology consultant, writer, and researcher. Lily’s first book is The Shaping of Us: How Everyday Spaces Structure Our Lives, Behaviour, and Well-Being. She regularly speaks at forums such as Clerkenwell Design Week, the London Festival of Architecture, and OpenHouse Worldwide. Her work and writing have been featured in The Guardian, BBC Capital, Architecture Today, the London Evening Standard, and The List.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Coffee Pods

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 
Direct download: 367_-_A_Home_that_Loves_You_with_Lily_Bernheimer.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:23pm CEST

Whether you’re a devout believer or a staunch atheist, the research is clear: prayer works. Here’s what also works: introspective time, mindfulness, positive focus, and big ideas. Science has proven that your brain physically changes through the regular practice of prayer, meditation, and mindfulness, and the changes can happen in as little as six to eight weeks. Our guest on this week’s show has dedicated his life to the study of positive neural changes through prayer and spiritual practices, and his discoveries will surprise you. 

Listen & Learn: 

  • The three-yawn technique for instant mindfulness
  • How prayer, meditation, and mindfulness can change your brain
  • Why these positive benefits have nothing to do with the existence (or inexistence) of God
  • How chanting, singing, and spiritual experiences are only valuable if there is time afterward to integrate and reflect on the experience 

Links & Resources:  

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Mark Robert Waldman is Executive MBA Faculty at Loyola Marymount University. He teaches the NeuroLeadership program. He is the author of 14 books including Words Can Change Your Brain and How God Changes Your Brain. He has been featured on PBS, National Public Radio, Canadian National Television, Oprah and Friends, and in dozens of national magazines. He is also on the faculty of Holmes Institute.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Artificial Sweeteners Any Good

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  • Leave us a Review on iTunes 
Direct download: 366_-_How_God_and_Big_Ideas_Change_Your_Brain_with_Mark_Robert_Waldan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:15pm CEST

Many women start hormonal birth control in their teens and continue for years or even decades. This can be a responsible decision, but most people don’t realize the long-term side effects and risks including infertility, reduced libido, weight gain, and even mood disorders. With all things birth control, there is no one-size-fits-all solution, but throwing a pill at the issue without weighing the options is surely a bad idea. On this week’s show, you’ll meet Dr. Jolene Brighten, a women’s hormone specialist who will help you make an informed decision about what’s right for you.

Listen & Learn: 

  • How the Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs) can be just as effective as hormonal options 
  • Why the pill contributes to increased miscarriage rates and infertility later 
  • How the pill can cause adrenal and thyroid problems 
  • Why IUDs are back, and why you might try this old-school method 
  • How the pill is often misused to treat irregular periods, PCOS, PMS, and acne

Links & Resources: 

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Dr. Jolene Brighten is a functional naturopathic medical doctor who focuses on women’s endocrine health. She’s an expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long-term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Yerba mate

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Direct download: 365_-_Birth_Control_Pill_-_Risk_vs_Reward_w_Dr._Jolene_Brighten.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:36am CEST

Did you know that 80 percent of generic drugs are manufactured in India or China, thousands of miles from the US FDA inspectors? When it comes to oversight, manufacturing safety, and transparency, it’s a huge problem when Big Brother is on the other side of the planet. Generic drugs offer consumers huge cost savings, but is safety and regulation the price we have to pay in order to afford our medicines? On this week’s show, you’ll meet an investigative journalist who uncovered the real problems with the generic medicine market.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why you should be most concerned about medicines you take regularly
  • How carcinogens, toxins, and even bacterial/viral infections are a real risk in manufacturing
  • Why ‘surprise visits’ are impossible for non-US-based manufacturing facilities
  • Why ‘first-to-file’ incentives encourage companies to cut corners
  • How the Indian concept of Jugaad might be at odds with safety

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Katherine Eban is an investigative journalist and author. Her articles have won international attention and numerous awards appearing in Fortune, Vanity Fair, The New York Times, Self, The Nation, and The New York Observer. Her work has been featured on 60 Minutes, Nightline, and NPR. She is the author of Dangerous Doses and a new book, Bottle of Lies.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Raw Honey

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Direct download: 364_-_Bottle_of_Lies_with_Katherine_Eban.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:44pm CEST

I used to say, “I’m bad with names!” It wasn’t until my late 30s that I realized this was just an excuse for not learning how to remember names. Turns out, it’s not that hard. I’m not amazing, but I’m now pretty good and getting better all the time. My big secret? I put some effort into it.

My guest on this week’s show is a four-time USA memory champion. Here is a short list of his accomplishments:

  • Memorized 217 names in 15 minutes
  • Memorized 256 words in 15 minutes
  • Memorized 907 digits in 30 minutes
  • Memorized a deck of cards in < 41 seconds

Memory skills are more than party tricks. It is a way to train and harness the power of your mind through specific techniques that can spill over with benefits into every aspect of your life. This is a fun one.

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ABOUT OUR GUEST

Nelson Dellis is a 4x USA Memory Champion and one of the leading memory experts in the world. He is a competitive memory athlete, memory consultant, published author, and keynote speaker. As a memory champion, mountaineer, and Alzheimer's disease activist, he preaches a lifestyle that combines fitness— both mental and physical—with proper diet and social involvement. He is the author of the book, Remember It!, and he founded a non-profit charity that aims to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer's. He has climbed numerous peaks around the world for this cause, including three times on Mount Everest.

Nelson has been featured on FOX's Superhumans, The TODAY Show, Fox and Friends, The Katie Couric Show, CNN.com, ABC Nightline, The Dr. Oz Show, The Science Channel, National Geographic, and SuperBrain China, among many other media outlets.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Sous Vide

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Direct download: 363_-_Improve_Your_Memory_with_Nelson_Dellis.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:24pm CEST

That glass of red wine after dinner soon turns into two or three. On Friday and Saturday, two or three often turns into a bottle or two. After a decade or more of drinking, it’s not uncommon to clock in 30+ drinks per week. It creeps up slowly, so it can almost go unnoticed. But your body, mind, and spirit notice, and it has a real impact. On this week’s show, you’ll meet a very successful executive who didn’t start drinking until her late 20s but quickly found herself living a lifestyle that she didn’t want as her trajectory.

Alcohol abuse comes in all sizes and shapes, and most people who drink fit the Center for Disease Control’s definition of excessive drinking. What does that mean for you? Maybe nothing. Maybe everything is going just great. Or maybe it means that you should reevaluate your relationship with alcohol and make sure you’re writing a story you’d like to author.

Listen & Learn:

  • How 8 drinks per week (for women) and 15 drinks per week (for men) is classified as “excessive” by the CDC
  • How the mind-body connection plays a role in pain, addiction, and substance abuse
  • How alcohol is baked into adult life, professional life, and almost every culture on the planet
  • Simple ways to rethink your alcohol relationship

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Annie Grace grew up in a one-room log cabin without running water or electricity outside of Aspen, Colorado. By the age of 26, Annie was the youngest vice president in a multinational company, and her drinking career began in earnest. By 35, in a global C-level marketing role, she was responsible for marketing in 28 countries and drinking almost two bottles of wine a night. She left her executive role to write her book, This Naked Mind.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Cilantro

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Direct download: 362_-_Do_You_Drink_Too_Much_w_Annie_Grace.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 11:34am CEST

When you think of a spiritual seeker, you probably conjure up images of shaved heads, orange robes, dark meditation halls, and gongs. But sitting in silence is not the only way to mediate. You can also run around in circles 12-14 hours a day, pushing your body and mental resolve to their limit. Every year, a dozen or so seekers show up in Queens, New York, to run around an unremarkable city block until they hit 59 miles. They do this for 52 days straight, 3100 miles total. This extreme race has been happening since 1997, and many runners are repeat participants. Our guest on this week’s show directed a film profiling this race and the global phenomenon of running as a spiritual practice.

Listen & Learn:

  • How average people, older people, and non-athletes are completing this race
  • How ultra-running can be mostly a mental challenge
  • How transcendence is the goal and a necessity for this type of race
  • How humans are truly born to run
  • Why a spiritual guru founded this race

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ABOUT OUR GUEST

Sanjay is a runner and documentary filmmaker whose films include Ocean Monk, Challenging Impossibility and Food Chains. His most recent film, 3100: Run and Become, details the world’s most elusive and elite multi-day foot race around one utterly unremarkable half-mile urban sidewalk block in Queens, New York. The race demands competitors to complete at least 59 miles a day for 52 straight days.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Eggs & Cholesterol

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Direct download: 361_-_The_3100_Mile_Foot_Race_with_Sanjay_Rawal.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:54am CEST

Real health is more than just food and exercise. The key elements we often overlook are love, support, community, and stress management. These factors are so much more difficult to manage but potentially even more important than nailing the perfect diet or workout routine. My guest on this week’s podcast has an incredible track record for reversing and healing heart disease through lifestyle interventions, and he shares his very simple four-pronged approach to health and wellness for life.

Listen & Learn:

  • How to stress less
  • Why movement and love matter so much
  • How simple holistic health can be
  • Why it’s important to get clear about your life goals

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dean Ornish, M.D., is the founder and president of the non-profit Preventive Medicine Research Institute. He is the Clinical Professor of Medicine at both UCSF and UCSD. He was recognized as "one of the 125 most extraordinary University of Texas alumni in the past 125 years;" as a "TIME 100 Innovator" by TIME magazine; as "one of the 50 most influential members of his generation” by LIFE magazine; as "one of the most interesting people of the year" by People magazine; and as "one of the world's seven most powerful teachers" by Forbes magazine. His most recent book, Undo It, is available on his website or Amazon.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Rapeseed Oil

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Direct download: 360_-_Undo_It_with_Dr._Dean_Ornish.mp3
Category:Health -- posted at: 3:41pm CEST

Your social media feed is filled with the curated lives of a bunch of strangers who you “follow” for no obvious reason. They are better-looking than you, their lunch looks tastier, their prose is so witty. Wow, what a life. But is it real? Probably not.

On an average day, most of us feel a combination of overwhelm, exhaustion, silliness, joy, loss, fear, anxiety, and depression. For a few wonderful moments, we get lost in our work or family lives, we get sucked into an inspiring story or enchanted by a new idea. And then our stomach hurts and tomorrow’s responsibilities begin to suck away the momentary peace of today.

Real life is a big, sloppy soup of emotions and the challenge is this: How do you find your authentic self amidst all that? Who are you really and what drives you? How can you cut through the Starbucks and puppies selfies to figure out what you’re supposed to be doing with yourself in this one precious life you have? My guest on this week’s podcast has some ideas.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why we give ourselves what we feel we deserve
  • Why clarity and purpose can cause you uneasiness (at first)
  • How to use isolated dreaming to figure yourself out
  • What to do when you know only what you don’t want  

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Philip McKernan is a speaker, author, and entrepreneur. He teaches people to become more intuitive so they know when they are on the right path. Philip works around the world with individuals, couples, and corporate organizations such as Shell and more recently the Canadian Olympic team before the London games. He’s the author of One Last Talk: Rich on Paper, Poor on Life available on Amazon or on his site.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Micotoxins in Coffee

Got Questions?

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Direct download: 359_-_How_to_Live_Your_Authentic_Life_with_Philip_McKernan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:13pm CEST

From the melting ice caps to dying marine reefs and depleted fish populations, we’re facing some big challenges right now, but very few people flip the lens to look at their own bodies to ask: “How are these petrochemical toxins affecting me and my family?”

The truth is, toxins affect all of us from the moment we’re born. Newborns enter the world with 200+ chemical toxins inside them, and the quantity tends to go up and up as we age. Plastics can make your fat cells bigger and mess up your hormones. Chemical additives in foods can give you brain fog and mood disorders. Artificial sweeteners can affect cognition, digestion, and hunger. These toxins are huge and growing problems, and most people are not paying attention.

On this week’s show, you’ll meet a medical doctor, a father, and a researcher who is uncovering simple truths about our toxic world along with practical solutions for staying sane and healthy.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why you should cook with stainless steel or cast iron
  • Why plastics #3, #6 and #7 are the worst (look at the recycling symbol)
  • How microwaving plastics can release endocrine disruptors
  • Why canned foods of all types should be avoided
  • Why hormones-disruptors can affect everything from your mood, waistline and sex drive
  • Why Europe has banned 1300 chemicals in household and food products and the USA has only banned 11
  • Why flame-retardants are required in the USA, despite questionable efficacy huge side effects
  • Why you should buy paraben-free, phthalate-free, and SLS-free products
  • Why “fragrance” is often code for “dangerous chemical we’d like to keep secret”

Links & Resource:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Leonardo Trasande is a pediatrician, professor, and researcher. He is the author of the new book, Sicker, Fatter, Poorer: The Urgent Threat of Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals to Our Health and Future and What We Can Do About It.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Cashews Moldy

Got Questions?

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Direct download: 358_-_Toxins_Make_You_Sicker_Fatter__Poorer.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:02pm CEST

The two big reasons marriages fail are sex and money. While finances are by no means easy, you can always go get another job, cut back, add on, or get creative. These creative solutions rarely play out well when it comes to sex, so you can quickly see why challenges often end in disaster. Sexuality is such a private issue, something most people prefer to discuss behind closed doors; but in reality, they don’t even discuss it in privacy either. Mostly, it goes unspoken.

So what do you do? What is sexuality? How does it change as you age, have kids, and grow older? On this week’s show, you’ll meet a sex therapist with a very simple and practical approach to sex and sexuality. He’ll share his time-tested clinical experiences and hopefully shed some light on the challenges in the bedroom.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why good sex is fundamentally about getting stupid and happy together
  • How children can sometimes kill sexuality in a relationship
  • How age and mismatched desire can create new challenges in a couple
  • Men vs. women: is there a difference?
  • Why we often protest during the day the things we fantasize about at night

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Stephen Snyder, MD is a sex and relationship therapist in Manhattan, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine, a regular contributor to Huffington Post and Psychology. Today, a frequent guest on major media, and one of America's most original voices of sex and relationships. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and children. He is the author of the book Love Worth Making.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Tahini Raw

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Direct download: 357_-_Healthy_Sex_Happy_Relationship_with_Dr._Stepthen_Snyder.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:39pm CEST

I had nosebleed nearly every single day in 1988. It would usually happen midday, and while I got pretty good at predicting it, I still remember bleeding on some very important textbooks, my Iowa Basics tests (old school standardized tests), and my white t-shirts. Eventually, my family doctor did some kind of cauterization procedure and it stopped—hooray!

Every kid has some weird health thing, whether it’s bumps on their belly from the swimming pool or endless streams of mucus from their noses, so I never thought anything of it until 30 years later. I met a guy who had an autoimmune condition that the doctors finally traced back to black mold in his home that started after a flood. I’d never even heard of black mold.

Here’s how it works: Your bathtub overflows, water drips into the floor, and then you clean it up. But the water in the floorboards drips down into the walls and ceiling and it gets moldy. That mold might just sit there, but it might spread. It might stay trapped in the walls, but it might start to get into your heating ducts or get released during construction.

And the problem? In many cases, these molds are super toxic, even neurotoxic. What does this have to do with my nosebleeds? It’s one of the top symptoms of mold exposure, and I was sleeping in a moldy basement at the time. Luckily, my nosebleeds were no big deal, particularly in comparison to the conditions that household mold can trigger in others.

On this week’s show, Dr. Ann Shippy will share her research and best practices for protecting your home and family from black mold.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why as many as 50% of homes might have a mold issue
  • Why some mycotoxins are not visible and don’t necessarily smell bad
  • How mold can cause headaches, skin conditions, bloody noses, and even cause much more serious conditions
  • How to take care of you and your loved ones

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Dr. Ann Shippy is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Functional Medicine. As a humanitarian and founder of two foundations (Good Food Matterz Foundation and Toxicity Matters Foundation), she wants to help create a world of wellness. She has written two books, Mold Toxicity Workbook and Shippy Paleo Essentials.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • What are the essential supplements

Got Questions?

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Direct download: 356_-_Can_Mold_in_Your_House_Harm_Your_Health_with_Dr._Ann_Shippy_V2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:32am CEST

“Change the way you think about things, and the things you think about will change.” This cliche sums up 80 percent of modern personal development, but it’s about as useful as marital advice that suggests a minute-long daily hug will ensure everlasting love or financial advice that suggests if you skip your morning latte and save the money you’ll get rich someday.

Has any of this ever actually worked for anyone? I doubt it.

If I were to ask you about work or family or your country, you’d immediately have an emotionally-charged response—much of which may be negative. You can flip the script and tell yourself a different story, but those underlying emotions brew below the surface. No one has ever thought their way out of any major crisis. It all comes down to action.

What are you going to do?

With mental health problems, unfortunately, most of us do nothing. We feel depressed or anxious, so we try to wait it out. Our home life is suffocating, so we try a gratitude journal to change the story in our head. The office is a black hole where souls get vaporized, so we spend the day on Instagram trying to change the way we think about things.

On this week’s podcast, we’ll talk about the need for the Mind Detox method. Clear out your head trash and make space for new feelings, new experiences, and a new way of living.

Listen & Learn:

  • How food and eating habits are often where mental and emotional problems appear
  • How self-care techniques like yoga and tapping can empower you to have some control
  • How your past is never really the past unless you deal with it and resolve painful issues

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Sandy C. Newbigging is a meditation teacher, monk, mentor, speaker, and author. He is also the creator of Mind Detox, Mind Calm, Body Calm and Calm Cure coaching and meditation techniques, collectively known as Calmology.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Frozen Food

Got Questions?

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Direct download: 355_-_Mind_Detox_Clean_Out_Your_Headtrash_with_Sandy_Newbigging.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:08pm CEST

Your dental health is very often the proverbial canary in the coal mine, meaning that periodontal disease is often a red flag that systemic problems exist which could be very serious. Proper brushing and hygiene are essential, of course, but dental health starts from within, particularly with the foods and nutrients you eat.

So what’s the problem? Our modern diets lack essential bone-health nutrients like fat-soluble vitamins D, K, and A. Foods are loaded with sugar and create an overly-acidic environment in the mouth which can lead to decay. On this week’s show, you’ll meet a holistic dentist who advocates dental care from the inside out, proper nutrition, and of course, great hygiene.

Listen & Learn:

  • Is Xylitol good for dental care?
  • Fluoride vs. no fluoride
  • Fat-soluble vitamins A, K2 (4 vs 7) & D3
  • Should you whiten your teeth?

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST


Dr. Steven Lin is a functional dentist, TEDx speaker, and author of the book, The Dental Diet. As a passionate preventative, whole health advocate, Dr. Lin focuses on the understanding of dental disease through nutritional principles.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Insect Protein

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Direct download: 354_-_Straight_White_Teeth_with_Dr._Steven_Lin.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:31pm CEST

I signed up for my first 12-day meditation retreat in 2001, and then I dropped out two weeks before the start date. I never drop out of anything. Eighteen months later, I signed up again. This time, I was ready.

It was exactly as you might suspect: a room full of people sitting on cushions—not speaking, not moving—for days at a time. There were no chanting nor prayers, no incense nor gurus. It wasn’t that kind of place. The instructional aspect of the course could easily be summarized in three words: sit, observe, accept.

Within 15 minutes of my arrival, I realized I’d entered a special kind of hell also known as my own head. I sat, and sat, and sat, and sat some more.

On the fourth day, someone sneezed in the meditation hall, and I nearly had a heart attack. By the seventh day, I was convinced I could see through my eyelids. The room remained unchanged for the past week, so for all intents and purposes, I really could see through my eyelids. Open or closed, everything was the same.

The guy next to me stank of mold and armpits. The person in front of me would groan and convulse in discomfort every 15 minutes. At least, I thought, he was suffering more than me. By the end of day eight, I’d re-lived every single unfinished conversation of my life, from the big ones to the most mundane encounters you could imagine. My own mental archives embarrassed me. They were (and are) so petty. On day 12, when we could finally speak again, I had nothing to say. I was hungry and horny; exhausted and thoughtful.

This was my introduction to meditation, and while I wish I could say it was smooth sailing since then, I find it more and more challenging every year; and oddly, the more I struggle, the more benefits I experience. There seems to be an inverse relationship between struggle in meditation and my happiness.

My guest on this week’s show is a meditator, teacher, author, and speaker. I’m a novice, he’s a pro. I think you’ll learn a lot from our discussion.

Listen & Learn:

  • How spirituality is about a personal practice of inner transformation
  • Why mindfulness means to “remember to wake up” or experience the self in the present moment
  • How Jewish culture of suffering, knowledge, and self-inquiry resonates with Buddhist teachings
  • Why suffering is an inevitable part of life
  • Weapons of peace

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Stephen Fulder, Ph.D., is a spiritual teacher, author, and founder of the Israel Insight Society (Tovana). He has been teaching Buddhist teachings and meditation practice to thousands of people over the last 20 years. He has 40 years of Vipassana/Mindfulness meditation and dharma practice and Buddhist studies.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Carbonated Water

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Direct download: 2_-_353_-_Inner_Peace_Global_Peace_with_Stephen_Fulder.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:36pm CEST

I love everything that’s bad for me, and alcohol certainly falls under that umbrella. It’s a love-hate relationship really, and I don’t drink anymore. At this stage of my life, it’s just not worth it. Am I boring and health-obsessed? Probably. But maybe you are too.

Here’s what we know about booze: Sixty-one million Americans are classified as binge alcohol users and 16 million as heavy alcohol users. Alcohol plays a role in one in three cases of violent crimes, and 10,000 people die each year in alcohol-related car accidents in the U.S. alone.

But most people who drink too much or too often are not alcoholics, so the problem goes unaddressed and unresolved—and yet, the lifelong impact is massive. My guest on this week’s podcast was an over-drinker who started a 30-day sober challenge that has lasted over six years. If you’re concerned that you might be drinking too much or too often, this is an important show to listen to.

Listen & Learn:

  • The difference between high bottom drinking vs. low bottom drinking
  • How moderate drinking can be a story you tell yourself
  • Why alcohol can affect just about everyone
  • Why if you think you have a problem, you probably do
  • What life is like on the other side of the bottle

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Belle Robertson is Canadian but lives in Paris. She’s a writer, baker, and caterer. She’s also a “sober coach” and her book, Tired of Thinking About Drinking, is available on her website along with her 100-Day Sober Challenge.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Aspartame

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Direct download: 352_-_Stop_Thinking_About_Drinking_with_Belle_Robertson_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:22pm CEST

Have you ever driven from your house to the office and were unable to remember anything about the drive? Have you lost track of days and even weeks when stress and frustration turned your brain to mush?  

What would your work and your life look like if you knew how to stay focused yet flexible; if you got more of the right things done; if you were helping to create a more peaceful world at the same time? These questions are posed by mindfulness trainer, Marc Lesser, my guest on this week’s podcast.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why asking and listening are rare and yet so valuable
  • Why solo meditation practice is miserable for most people
  • How corporate culture can dramatically change when people are present, emotionally open, and connected

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST:

Marc helped develop a program called Search Inside Yourself (SIY) within Google that integrates mindfulness, emotional intelligence, and business savviness for building strong corporate cultures. He founded and was CEO of three different companies. He is the author of four books and has an MBA from New York University. Marc was a resident of the San Francisco Zen Center for 10 years, as well as director of Tassajara Zen Mountain Center. His latest book, Seven Practices of a Mindful Leader, is available now.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • 30-30-30

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Direct download: 351_-_Mindful_Leadership__Emotional_Intelligence_with_Marc_Lesse.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:43pm CEST

I spent my first 27 years of life convinced that men and women were exactly the same except for the obvious anatomical differences and a boatload of socialization. After a big relationship breakup, I read the modern classic book, Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus, and quickly learned I was wrong about so many things.

Men and women are very different, not just in how we are socialized but in undeniable biochemical and neurological ways that impact us constantly. Different doesn’t mean better nor does it mean worse, stronger, or less capable. Different means different—wonderfully, infuriatingly different.

A huge part of what I’ve been most criticized for in life has nothing to do with who I am as a person; it’s just my masculine self expressing itself strongly. And a huge part of what drove me crazy about women was not who they were as people but their very nature that I didn’t appreciate or understand. Ignorance, in this case, is not bliss. It’s a guaranteed plan for constant conflict at home.

This week, you’ll meet the most influential relationship expert on the planet, Dr. John Gray. His books and his work have made their way into just about every school, university, and bedside table in the world. It would be a mistake not to invest time in learning from John.  

Listen & Learn:

  • How most modern lifestyles lead to hormonal imbalances
  • How the feminine “recharges” vs how the masculine “resets”
  • Why we need to celebrate differences rather than try to suppress them
  • How to navigate the challenges of polarity

Links & Resources

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. John Gray, Ph.D. is the best-selling relationship author of all time. He is the author of over 20 books, including Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex. Over 50 million copies in 50 different languages around the world have been sold.

John is a leading internationally-recognized expert in the fields of communication and relationships. His unique focus is assisting men and women in understanding, respecting and appreciating their differences. John's advice can easily be used to improve relationships at home and in the workplace.

For more than 35 years, John has conducted public and private seminars for thousands of participants. John entertains and inspires audiences with practical communication techniques. He is a popular speaker on the national and international lecture circuit and often appears on television and radio programs to discuss his work. He has made guest appearances on such shows as Oprah, The Dr. Oz Show, Good Morning America, The Today Show, CBS This Morning, Larry King Live, CNN and many others. He was also the subject of a three-hour special hosted by Barbara Walters. Dr. John Gray lives with his wife and children in Northern California.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Cannot eat raw food

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Direct download: 350_-_Demystifying_Men_Women__Polarity_With_Dr._John_Gray_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:32pm CEST

The average life expectancy is nearly 83 years where I live. People are living healthier, wealthier, and longer lives than ever before, but what the heck do you do in that last third portion of your life? Golf or bingo? Yoga or CrossFit? It’s really hard to know what options we’ll have in our 80s, but it also seems pretty foolish not to plan for it now.

On this week’s show, you’ll meet a New York Times writer who extensively profiled six elders (over 85) in New York City. He’ll share what he learned about living and dying with us on the show.

Listen & Learn:

  • The role of choice in happiness in later life
  • Why isolation from a purpose can be just as painful as social isolation
  • How pain and illness are less important than how people choose to interpret them in the context of their lives
  • How “no regrets” is a common theme with age

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST
John Leland is a reporter at The New York Times, where he wrote a year-long series that became the basis for Happiness Is a Choice You Make. He is also the author of Hip: The History and Why Kerouac Matters: The Lessons of On the Road.

Before joining the Times, he was a senior editor at Newsweek, editor in chief of Details, a reporter at Newsday, and a writer and editor at Spin.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Cooking Oils

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Direct download: 349_-_The_Wisdom_of_Old_People_with_John_Leland_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:58pm CEST

After the age of 40, there is less space between your spinal vertebrae than when you were 20. This steady degeneration of tissues happens predictably but can be exacerbated by weight, high stress, extreme athletics, and even accidents. Aside from the natural wear and tear on our joints, many people also suffer from autoimmune attacks which affect the soft tissues, causing pain, inflammation, and even deformity in extreme cases. We’re talking about arthritis. And, not surprisingly, yoga can be a very effective management strategy for anyone with these problems.

On this week’s show, we’ll help define and understand the many different conditions of arthritis, and we’ll explore ways to reduce and even eliminate symptoms through movement.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How “arthritis” is a general term for hundreds of conditions
  • The difference between wear and tear joint degeneration vs. autoimmune conditions
  • Why knees, hips, and low back are the most problematic
  • How x-rays and scans can give insight into joint-space narrowing
  • The risk of rheumatoid cachexia that includes muscle loss
  • Responsible use of cortisone, ibuprofen, and other medications
  • Why strong quads can add years of life to your knees  

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Steffany Moonaz founded Yoga for Arthritis after eight years at Johns Hopkins University where she studied the effects of yoga for people living with arthritis. She now serves as the Director of Clinical and Academic Research at the Maryland University of Integrative Health, which offers the nation's only Masters of Science in Yoga Therapy.

She continues to conduct research on the effects of yoga for chronic pain and joint conditions, and she mentors yoga teachers, yoga therapists, and emerging researchers. She is passionate about ensuring that yoga practices are safe, welcoming, and appropriate for people with arthritis nationwide.

Links & Resources:

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Sllimming Tea

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Direct download: 348_-_Yoga_for_Arthritis_with_Dr._Steffany_Moonaz__mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:42pm CEST

Environmental activist, Colin Beavan, and his family decided to make a bold statement: they’d spend an entire year living as close to “zero impact” as possible in the heart of New York City. They’d ditch subways and taxis, food that came from further than 100 miles away, and TV. In the end, they’d gain a new perspective on life.

Listen & Learn:

  • How the average American creates 1600 lbs of trash each year
  • How Colin and his wife and daughter went “zero impact” for a full year in NYC
  • What it means to redefine life without all the consumerism
  • How to truly be alive

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Colin Beavan is a speaker, author and expert on environmental issues, consumerism, and human quality of life. He has spoken at companies including Clif Bar, the North Face, and Ideo. He’s been featured in numerous media outlets and TV programs including The Colbert Report, Good Morning America, and Nightline.

Colin has a couple of books, How to Be Alive: A Guide to the Kind of Happiness that Helps the World and No Impact Man. His documentary film, also called No Impact Man, was featured at Sundance and has been shown in theaters and on TV around the world.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Why is Fruit Sugar Bad

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Direct download: 347_-_No_Impact_Man_-_Save_the_Planet_with_Colin_Beavan_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:52pm CEST

When we think of strength and muscle mass, we typically imagine physique-obsessed bodybuilders staring at themselves in the mirror and clanking weights around in the gym.

But what if there is more to the story? What if lean muscle is more than just aesthetics, particularly as we age?

My guest on this week’s show is a trial lawyer who represented two former presidents. He’s an avid skier and a gym rat who still skis at Vail with his granddaughter, still tries cases, and remains as sharp as ever at 86 years old. It’s a remarkable story, and Fred Bartlit credits his health to a lifelong commitment to pumping iron. Don’t miss this show—it’s an eye-opener.  

Listen & Learn:

  • How sarcopenia can cause a loss of 1% of strength per year after middle age
  • How your telomere length might predict longevity
  • How a lack of exercise correlates with early death
  • How to “die living” not “live dying” as you age

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Fred is a former US Army Ranger and trial lawyer who has represented two former presidents. Co-founder of StrongPath, demonstrating that frailty doesn’t need to be an inevitable part of aging, Fred says he’s stronger now at 86 years old than he was in his 20s thanks to a lifelong commitment to good exercise habits.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Healthy skin

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This no-nonsense health and wellness show features best-selling authors and thought leaders in nutrition, mental health, relationships, and self-improvement. Each episode also includes listener Q&A. Hosted by yoga trainer, writer, and expert speaker, Lucas Rockwood, the founder of YOGABODY and The Yoga Teachers College.

Direct download: LRS_Promo_-_Audio_Only.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:27pm CEST

Group dynamics fascinate me. Why does one person take on the leadership role almost immediately without any need for introduction or approval? How did that one person decide he was the joker? And why is there always someone lurking in the back, avoiding eye contact and trying to be invisible?

I’ve been hosting training courses for 13 years now, and I’ve seen time and time again how we all tend to assume different social roles in group settings with enough people. It’s not always consistent or predictable but these patterns almost always emerge. Why?

On this week’s podcast, you’ll meet a behavioral researcher who has uncovered some powerful truths about human behavior that can help you be more effective in all your social interactions both personal and professional. We cover body language, topics of conversation, and so much more.

You’ll Learn:

  • Why negative talk can leave a negative impression on you as a person
  • How to gush, not gossip, to uplift and influence others around you
  • Eye contact vs. no eye contact: finding the balance
  • What to do with your hands when you talk

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Vanessa Van Edwards is a behavioral investigator. She runs a human behavior research lab called the Science of People. She's been featured on CNN, Fast Company, and Forbes. She also writes a monthly column for Entrepreneur Magazine and The Huffington Post. Her innovative work has been featured on NPR, Business Week, and USA Today.  

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Fermented Foods

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Most people believe that carbs give you energy, fat makes you fat, and protein builds muscles - but this is not how the body works. In fact, we metabolize macronutrients very differently - often counter-intuitively - and it's important to understand the hormonal impact of food as you attempt to find balance.

Too much protein can be just as problematic as too many carbs but how do you know how much is too much? What are some baseline measurements you can use in your own life? My guest on this week's podcast, Stephen Cabral, ND, will make this easy to understand.

Listen & Learn:

  • Risks, rewards, and reality of keto diets
  • Why protein is harder to digest
  • How 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight is usually ideal
  • Why too much protein creates too much IGF-1 that can feed cancer
  • Ectomorph/Vata: lean and long, difficulty building muscle
  • Endomorph/Kapha: higher body fat, often pear-shaped, gain muscle and fat easily
  • Mesomorph/Pitta: muscular and well-built, high metabolism, responsive muscle cells

Links & Resources:

 

ABOUT THE HOST

Stephen Cabral is a board-certified naturopathic doctor with post-doctoral specialties in Ayurvedic and functional medicine. He and his team have completed more than 250,000 client appointments. He is a podcaster himself at the Cabral Concept and is the author of The Rain Barrel Effect and A Man's Guide to Muscle and Strength.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Cabbage

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Direct download: 344_-_Goldilocks_Zone_for_Protein_with_Stephan_Cabral_ND.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:20pm CEST

 

Open up Instagram right now, and start counting the number of narcissists in your feed today. How many? Three, ten, fifty? Is there anyone real in your feed?

Narcissistic personalities have always existed, but with social media, it's a bigger problem than ever. These hyper-insecure people lack empathy, live in a constant state of conflict, and value status and outward appearances over real human connection and understanding.

Why does it matter? Because we work with them, we live with them, and in some cases, we even marry and spend our lives with them. In this week's podcast, you'll meet a clinical psychologist who shares her pragmatic and down-to-earth approach to living with or running from the narcissists in your life.  

Listen & Learn:

  • How to identify a narcissist.
  • Why the stereotypical "successful man" today is often the definition of a narcissist.
  • Realistic outlook of change (hint: low to none).
  • Should you stay, or should you go?

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Ramani Durvasula is a licensed clinical psychologist. She has a private practice in Santa Monica and Sherman Oaks, CA. She is a professor of psychology at Cal State Los Angeles where she was named "Outstanding Professor" in 2012. She is also a visiting professor at the University of Johannesburg.

She is the author of two books: Should I Stay or Should I Go: Surviving a Relationship With a Narcissist (Post Hill Press), and You Are WHY You Eat: Change Your Food Attitude, Change Your Life. She has appeared on nearly every major television network, as well as radio, print, and internet platforms.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Potatoes

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Direct download: 343_-_Narcissist_Survival_Guide_with_Dr._Ramani_Durva-sula.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:54pm CEST

Modern medicine's best thinking pales in comparison to the wisdom of our bodies. The best science only has a very rudimentary understanding of the dynamic and complex organism we inhabit, and yet we're always looking for the magic pill and the prescriptive cure.On this week's show, we'll explore ancestral wisdom for the modern man and the seemingly impossible attempt to find a balance.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why dead people don't teach us everything we need to know about living people
  • How to work with your body for health and healing
  • Why a 'sick' response is often just the body's healthy response to self-care
  • How the flawed current medical system is more about maintenance and survival than health

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Cowan has served as vice president of the Physicians Association for Anthropo-sophical Medicine and is a founding board member of the Weston A. Price Foundation™.  He is the principal author of the book The Fourfold Path to Healing and the co-author of The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care. He writes the 'Ask the Doctor' column in Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts. He has lectured throughout the United States and Canada.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • Blending Smoothies Any Good

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Direct download: 342_-_Traditional_vs._Alternative_Medicine.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:13pm CEST

By the end of the 1700s, the average American consumed four teaspoons of sugar a day. One hundred years later, that number had risen to eighteen teaspoons. Today, we're consuming 22 teaspoons (93 grams) per day, and it's a huge problem. Diabetes rates are through the roof, and elevated blood sugar levels contribute to nearly every major disease and illness.

But... we all love sugar. We're genetically wired to seek it out and gorge on it. So how do we even begin to find balance in a sugar- and carb-laden world? After a scary bout of Hashimoto's Disease, our guest on this week's podcast dedicated her life to researching and eliminating sugar. She'll share the bitter truth about sugar and how to break free from your addiction to it.

Listen & Learn:

  • Why fructose (fruit sugar) gives you a beer belly
  • How "natural sugars" can be even worse than plain white sugar
  • Why it's nearly impossible to not cook and be healthy
  • How to begin your own sugar detox
  • Why agave is the worst sweetener on the market

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Sarah is a New York Times bestselling author, former journalist, and founder of the former site, IQuitSugar.com. She wrote the book, First, We Make the Beast Beautiful, as well as 15 different I Quit Sugar books.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  •  Iron

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Direct download: 341_-_Sugar_is_the_Devil_with_Sarah_Wilson.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:53pm CEST

“He who has a why to live can bear almost any how.” - Friedrich Nietzsche

What in your inner world enables you to fully show up in the outer world? What is more important: What you have or how you feel?

On this week's podcast, you'll meet Susan David, PhD, who has dedicated her life to emotional health. She'll inform you how to ask yourself better questions, lean into pain (when necessary), and craft a truly fulfilling life based on your values.  

Listen & Learn:

  • Why our inner world often matters more than the outer world
  • How to uncover your individual ‘why’ and define your core values
  • Why ‘have-to’ goals are impossible, whereas value-based goals actually work
  • Why approach goals are powerful, but adverse goals are even stronger
  • Why ‘smile or die’ can actually cause you less joy and make it more difficult to find peace
  • How to show up and hold space for pain and suffering
  • What was worth my while today

Links & Resources:

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Susan David, co-founder and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, teaches psychology at Harvard University and is the CEO of Evidence Based Psychology. As a speaker and consultant, Susan has worked with senior leadership at hundreds of organizations, including the United Nations, Ernst & Young, and the World Economic Forum. Her work has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Time, Fast Company, and the Wall Street Journal, and she is the author of The Oxford Handbook of Happiness, the definitive text for researchers and practitioners interested in human happiness.

Nutritional Tip of the Week:

  • How Many Supplement is Too Much

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Direct download: 340_-_Emotional_Agility__Podcast_w_Susan_David_PhDd.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:43pm CEST

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